Jim Harper

Former Executive Vice President, Competitive Enterprise Institute

Jim Harper was executive vice president at the Competitive Enterprise Institute until 2018. Previously, Harper was a senior fellow at the Cato Institute. A former counsel to committees in both the U.S. House and the U.S. Senate, he went on to represent companies such as PayPal, ICO-Teledesic, DigitalGlobe, and Verisign, and in 2014 he served as Global Policy Counsel for the Bitcoin Foundation.

A founding member of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Data Privacy and Integrity Advisory Committee, Harper co-edited the book Terrorizing Ourselves: How U.S. Counterterrorism Policy Is Failing and How to Fix It. He has written several amicus briefs in Fourth Amendment cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, and is the author of Identity Crisis: How Identification Is Overused and Misunderstood. He has been cited by numerous print, Internet, and television media outlets and has written for the New York TimesWall Street Journal, and other leading publications. His scholarly articles have appeared in the Administrative Law ReviewMinnesota Law Review, and Hastings Constitutional Law Quarterly.

Harper holds a JD from the University of California–Hastings College of Law.

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