Michael D. Ramsey

Prof. Michael D. Ramsey

Hugh and Hazel Darling Foundation Professor of Law, University of San Diego School of Law

Topics: Federalism & Separation of Powers • International & National Security Law

Michael D. Ramsey is Hugh and Hazel Darling Foundation Professor of Law at the University of San Diego School of Law, where he teaches and writes in the areas of Constitutional Law, Foreign Relations Law and International Law. He is the author of The Constitution’s Text in Foreign Affairs (Harvard University Press 2007), co-editor of International Law in the U.S. Supreme Court: Continuity and Change (Cambridge University Press 2011), and co-author of two casebooks, Transnational Law and Practice (Aspen 2015) and International Business Transactions: A Problem-Oriented Coursebook (12th ed., West 2015). His scholarly articles have appeared in publications such as the Yale Law Journal, the University of Chicago Law Review, the Georgetown Law Journal and the American Journal of International Law. He received his B.A. magna cum laude from Dartmouth College and his J.D. summa cum laude from Stanford Law School.  Prior to teaching, he served as a judicial clerk for Judge J. Clifford Wallace of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and for Justice Antonin Scalia of the United States Supreme Court, and practiced law with the law firm of Latham & Watkins, where he specialized in international finance and investment.  He has taught as a visiting professor at the University of California, San Diego, in the Department of Political Science and at the University of Paris – Sorbonne, in the Department of Comparative Law.

The Logan Act Today

The Logan Act Today

International & National Security Law Practice Group Teleforum

Recent developments have lead to the Logan Act resurfacing in the news. The Act was enacted...

Topics: Foreign Policy · International Law & Trade

The Logan Act – An Introduction

The Logan Act – An Introduction

The Logan Act, 18 U.S.C. §953, is an old but rarely-invoked federal statute prohibiting unauthorized...

Topics: First Amendment · Foreign Policy · Founding Era & History · International & National Security Law