Approaches to Studying Roman Law

Approaches to Studying Roman Law

Part I of V in a course on Roman Law.

A discussion of natural and positive law in Roman texts with an eye to more modern debates on the subject, including the relevance of studying Roman law.

Questions covered include: What is the value of the study of a system that, for much of duration, had slavery as a moral premise Does one need to be a classicist to study Roman Law? What is the link between the political regime and the biological and physical bases on which the edifice rests?  When is formalism appropriate and in what means in the interpretation of statutes?

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1 of 7: Is Roman Law a primitive system? [No. 86]

Are the laws of ancient Rome primitive? Professor Richard Epstein argues that, though the system is ancient, it is both sophisticated and durable, with surprising relevance to the modern world. Professor Epstein is the inaugural Laurence A. Tisch P ... Are the laws of ancient Rome primitive? Professor Richard Epstein argues that, though the system is ancient, it is both sophisticated and durable, with surprising relevance to the modern world.

Professor Epstein is the inaugural Laurence A. Tisch Professor of Law at NYU School of Law, a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, and Professor of Law Emeritus and a senior lecturer at the University of Chicago.

As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker.

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