Elizabeth Slattery

Senior Legal Fellow, Pacific Legal Foundation

Topics: Constitution • Supreme Court • Separation of Powers

Elizabeth Slattery is a senior legal fellow and deputy director of Pacific Legal Foundation's Center for the Separation of Powers. She’s an evangelist for the separation of powers, spreading the good news about the Constitution’s greatest protection for Americans’ individual liberties.

Elizabeth has written for the Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy, the Cato Supreme Court Review, and The Federalist Society Review, among other publications, and her work on the need to end improper judicial bias to federal regulators was cited by Justice Neil Gorsuch. Her opinion pieces have appeared in The Wall Street JournalThe Washington PostSCOTUSblogNational Review Online, and many other outlets. She has testified before Congress and is a frequent legal commentator in print, radio, and television. She's also the co-host of Dissed, a podcast about dissenting opinions at the Supreme Court.

Elizabeth previously worked at the Heritage Foundation and is a member of the Federalist Society’s Civil Rights Practice Group Executive Committee and the American Bar Association’s Standing Committee on Public Education.

She’s a graduate of Xavier University, where she studied history and music and where the Jesuits taught her to question everything. She received her J.D. from George Mason University’s Antonin Scalia Law School.

In her free time, you can find Elizabeth chasing her two young sons, reading historical fiction, playing Jeopardy! with her husband, and (in a nod to her Kentucky roots) drinking bourbon.

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